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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
it but i don't miss it. >> she's hearty though. let's go back to erin in kansas city, missouri. this storm is big and powerful and knocked your microphone. >> reporter: it is very windy. we expect gusts up to 30 miles an hour today. so the governors of kansas and missouri are urging people to stay off the roads and take precautions because they want to make sure people know that this storm will be more dangerous than the storm they had here just last week, john. >> erin, it does look -- it looks nasty out there. she's been here a week and we sent her to two blizzards in the plains states. thank you, erin. >> who would have thought back to back. >>> four minutes past the hour. we're following a developing story four. it is horror in a hot air touri bird's-eye view of the scene, it plummeted to the ground. what do you know? >> reporter: this is just an awful incident that's not going to bode well for egypt's already ailing tourism industry and the hot air balloon industry. first and foremost, you have to think about the families of the 20 victims. 20 people killed according to this hot air b
the midwest, i know. >> everyone takes it very seriously and stays safe there. thanks, erin. >> right now it looks like a winter wonderland. >> the storm is stretching from the dakotas to houston, texas. while it dumps snow in the north, it will pour heavy rain over new orleans and montgomery, alabama. and it could kick up tornadoes along the gulf coast as well. let's get right to jennifer delgado. she's in the weather senter in atlanta monitoring all of this for us. good morning. >> good morning, guys. you can see on the radar we have a lot of action out there. we have thunderstorms out there. you can see the lightning. line of storms developing through parts of texas as well as snow. we saw the live shot. the snow coming down even more on the way as well as that wintry mix affecting areas along interstate 44. so let's break this down for you. what can we expect today? a big mess out there if you're going to be traveling. as we go throughout the morning now, what you're going to see is the snow intensifying. as we move to the north through areas like celina, we're seeing the snow really
've got this extreme weather for you. erin, you've been there when the snow first started to fall and when it stopped and now comes the cleanup. >> reporter: well, and right now, today, it's a lot colder here this morning than it was yesterday. it's about 14 degrees. we hope our fingers don't freeze off. if you can see behind me, they're already starting to dig out. we've got that. now the national guard is patroling for stranded motorists throughout the state. wichita, where we are now, got a near record snowfall, 14.2". their record is 15.2". so, most of the states, schools are still closed today. although the airports are now open, starting to dig out there, too. believe it or not, what they're calling the blizzard of oz here in kansas is a welcomed development for a lot of residents. i spoke to one yesterday, kristen woodburn. here she is. >> it snows so infrequently here now, we've been in a really bad drought for several years. really, really hot temperatures in the summer and just no moisture. so, we're thrilled to see snow, ice, whatever moisture we can get. >> reporter: this is th
the circumstances of his death. >> you know, erin mclaughlin joins us from london. what does this discovery of richard iii mean? >> hi, christine. historians really think this is an opportunity to rewrite history. these are the culmination of months of detailed analysis, including dna testing, radio carbon testing, environmental sampling, and not only tell us beyond any sort of reasonable doubt that this was, in fact, richard iii, but they begin to paint a picture as to who this man was. he was 32 years old when he died. he was suffered from severe scoliosis or curvature of the spine, died at the battle of bosworth due to blunt trauma at the back of his head. his naked body strewn to a horse, brought to a grave and hastily dug and thrown in there without a shroud or coffin. we hope this will paint a different picture of richard iii, one that challenges shakespeare's portrayal of a i'll ha vile and evil monster. >> you hear of this story at the tower of london, how he killed his nephews, the little boys. and this was a medieval time when these were the things that dukes and kings did to each
will be closed. >> coming up at 10:00 a.m. eastern time, a cnn's special on the pope's last day, anchored by erin burnett and chris cuomo in new york and as well as christiane amanpour. it will be simulcast on cnni as well. >>> happening right now, the world and its 1.2 billion catholics witnessing a sitting pope in his final hours hours o throne of saint peter. >> in eight hours he will become pope emeritus. before that happens there is a lot else that will go on today. the pope, as we say, at this moment meeting many, many of the cardinals. many of them have gathered in rome. some are still arriving for the expected conclave that will happen probably a week, week and a half from now. we don't know the exact start date. the pope has been meeting and greeting each one of them, sharing a moment. earlier in the day, about 45 minutes ago, he did deliver some brief remarks to them. let's take a quick listen. >> translator: personally i would like to say that i will continue to serve you in prayer, in particular in the coming days, so that you may be touched by the holy spirit in the election of a new
driver who tried to protect him. here's erin burnett. >> give me five. i like it. >> reporter: nine days after ethan was freed from an underground bunker in alabama, the world is getting abrave glimpse of this 6-year-old. his mother tells dr. phil the recovery has been difficult. >> he's having a very hard time sleeping soundly. he slings his arms and tosses and turns and he's cried out a few times. >> reporter: in a story that captivated the nation, ethan was kidnapped at gun point from a school bus last month, his ab dublgt -- abductor, jimmy lee dykes. kirkland says dykes took surprisingly good care of his son. >> when he found out ethan was autistic and took medication, i believe that's why he started caring and letting ethan have the things that he was letting him have. >> reporter: authorities say dykes fed the boy, gave him toys and even allowed him to take medicine for his autism. kirkland told dr. phil, waiting for ethan's return was the hardest thing she's ever been through. >> i wanted to be there. there's not one second of this whole thing that i wouldn't have begged that man
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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